Under The Hedge

Plants, fungi, mantids, inverts, pretty pictures, interesting facts.

Yesterday morning I looked around my room and thought “I own to many Bromeliads”, but then I remembered that’s not a real thing and you can never have too many and if anything I need more.

Bulbophyllum sp. orchid from the Glasgow Botanics.

Bulbophyllum sp. orchid from the Glasgow Botanics.

Fern Microsorum pappei, in case you can’t read the label.
A terrestrial relative of the Java fern you might know from fish tanks (which can also grow out of water in high humidity).
Glasgow Botanics

Fern Microsorum pappei, in case you can’t read the label.

A terrestrial relative of the Java fern you might know from fish tanks (which can also grow out of water in high humidity).

Glasgow Botanics

Adorable tiny epiphytic orchid of some sort from the Glasgow Botanics.

Adorable tiny epiphytic orchid of some sort from the Glasgow Botanics.

Cryptanthus sp. bromeliad, aka an earth star.
Glasgow Botanics.

Cryptanthus sp. bromeliad, aka an earth star.

Glasgow Botanics.

A moderate sized staghorn fern (Platycerium bifurcatum I think) with a small Haresfoot fern of some sort (Davallia sp.) growing on it.

An epiphyte growing on an epiphyte, epiphyte-ception? I’m cool and pop-culture savvy…

Glasgow Botanics.

Some orchids I totally forgot the names of from the Glasgow Botanics.

Some Nepenthes sp. pitcher plant pitcher pictures.

Glasgow Botanics.

A Maxillaria sp. orchid from the Glasgow botanic gardens.

vondell-swain:

at the end of All Yesterdays (the extremely good book about imagining and illustrating dinosaurs in complex speculative ways i was talking about yesterday) there’s a section where they prove the point about the fact that we need to be more open to imagining skin coverings and fat/cartilage deposits by illustrating modern-day animals as if a nonhuman paleontologist from millions of years in the future reconstructed them using the just-skin-stretched-over-the-skeleton-and-muscles method that unimaginative paleoartists use with dinosaurs

with results like:

image

and

image

and

image

and i love it so much because it absolutely unquestionably proves the point the book is making

(Source: itsvondell, via magpiebones)